Monthly Archives: March 2017

Why they burn

Berlin book burning May 10, 1933 — (from image in U.S. public domain)

Berlin book burning May 10, 1933

Do you remember why Ray Bradbury’s firemen burned books? I thought of this again when I saw that the free speech advocates over the pond at English Pen were screening the movie version of Fahrenheit 451.

I confess to being skeptical whether they’ll get to the original reason, but maybe they will. Their announcement quotes from the book:

“If you don’t want a man unhappy politically, don’t give him two sides to a question to worry him; give him one. Better yet, give him none. Let him forget there is such a thing as war. If the government is inefficient, top-heavy, and tax-mad, better it be all those than that people worry over it.” — Ray Bradbury

Like most people, I’d forgotten Bradbury’s reason until The Observer’s Ryan Holiday reminded us of the real reason we need to stop trying to protect everyone’s feelings:

If you’d asked me what it was about before last week, I would have told you: “Firemen who burn books.”

And if you’d asked me why on earth they did that, I would have answered just as confidently: “Because a tyrannical government wanted them to.”

There is a trend afoot to conveniently remember the works of authors like Ray Bradbury and Aldous Huxley as warnings against distant totalitarianism and control. But this only scratches the surface of what these books are about.

Note that he said “conveniently remember.” That trend has only gotten worse. Or better, depending on your point-of-view.

Bradbury’s society did not burn books because of the government. Holiday quotes the book:

“You must understand that our civilization is so vast that we can’t have our minorities upset and stirred. Ask yourself, What do we want in this country above all? People want to be happy, isn’t that right? … Colored people don’t like Little Black Sambo. Burn it. White people don’t feel good about Uncle Tom’s Cabin. Burn it. Someone’s written a book on tobacco and cancer of the lungs? The cigarette people are weeping? Burn the book. Serenity, Montag. Peace, Montag. Take your fight outside. Better yet, to the incinerator.”

It’s the people rioting in the streets that want your books burned. Perhaps it’s not so much that Bradbury saw this coming but that it has often been this way.

It was the German Student Union that organized burning books with the SA brownshirts in Nazi Germany.

Colonizing the bubble

Wil Wheaton, Star Trek’s Wesley Crusher, is an internet star with a lot of Twitter followers.

He gets a lot more traffic than the rest of us do. Some of it must make him uncomfortable. I’m sure some of it is really bad. He’s apparently pretty quick with Twitter’s block feature. That’s where you tell it not to show you tweets from people you’d rather not hear from.

He has a reputation for blocking people simply for saying “Shut up, Wesley!”

That’s his right. The trouble I see is this:

Join that, and you’ll miss tweets simply because Wil Wheaton disagrees with their senders. That’s a lot of people to censor yourself from. Needing his block list is a sign that you’re on Twitter too much.

Bubbles are dangerous. Join his blocklist and you’re in one. I’m reminded of the apocryphal quote of Pauline Kael: “How could Nixon have won? Nobody I know voted for him.”

Just imagine missing a retweet simply because the original writer had once said, “Shut up, Wesley!”

Raumpatrouille: 1960s German SF

Raumpatrouille (Space Patrol) was a seven-episode German science fiction show in the ’60s. The style was somewhat reminiscent of the movie Forbidden Planet.

YouTuber Reboss gives a short but thorough explanation for English speakers:

The show is well worth a look. The first episode is here. Be sure to turn on the subtitles for a translation.

This is what people in the ’60s thought the future would be like. Expect more than a few scenes to be unintentionally funny. The dancing in the background reminds me of SNL’s Sprockets, which adds to the charm.

All seven episodes are here. Unfortunately, the subtitles for a few of these others seem to be in German.

Patrolling the seas in a new era

Found via OldNFO J.L. Curtis, who says Hawaii’s last P-3 squadron is leaving: “1937-2017… 80 years of maritime patrol squadrons is ending this week.”

This is one of history’s milestones. That was the first takeaway.

From Stars & Stripes: Last 3 planes from Navy patrol squadron to depart Hawaii for new home in Washington state.

This part was funny to me:

“This is an old bird, and I think we’re lucky that we’re catching and being able to be a part of this, because the new P-8s and new aircraft that are coming out now, they tell you what’s wrong through a computer,” said Young, who’s deploying with VP-9. He said he likes the fact that the P-3 is “old-school. It’s mechanical.”

I know that feeling. There were still P-3Bs flying in reserve squadrons when I was in the Navy, and I remember thinking that very same thing about their avionics. (I suppose the difference between a P-3B and P-3C didn’t matter as much to those in the cockpit.)

But I see this as more than wistful memories of P-3s. The Navy will still be flying those for a few more years. They just won’t be doing it out of Hawaii in significant numbers. Instead, they will only have a P-3C detached from Whidbey Island, Washington, until two P-8A Poseidons replace them. Only two.

It’s not so much about the P-3s leaving. They’ve had various types of aircraft before that. Think of the squadrons of PBYs flying out of there in WWII, then Marlins in the 1950s, P-2s and P-3As during the Vietnam War, followed by the P-3B through P-3E’s (although, apparently, VP-9 stopped with the P-3C). It is patrol operations in Hawaii that are practically closing up shop.

Part of this is that the Navy’s needs and budgets have changed. I’m hoping that another part is in greater capabilities of newer technologies. Perhaps some of that will be in the P-8. Then there are the roles played by the new satellites and drones.

Even here, the robots are taking over. That was the second takeaway.